Demodulation Rings

Many Celestion LF loudspeakers feature demodulation rings to substantially reduce inductive rise as well as harmonic and intermodulation distortion

April 22, 2014

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Demodulation rings substantially reduce the harmonic and intermodulation distortion associated with voice coil displacement. They also reduce the modulation of magnetic flux during the movement of the voice coil to make the variation of system inductances more linear as input current varies.

These electrically conductive 'shorting' rings are placed in strategic locations around the magnet gap such that they act as if they were a secondary circuit of a transformer (the voice coil and magnet pole piece being the primary arm of the transformer). 

The shorting ring is more effective (than the rest of the magnet assembly) at conducting away the unwanted electrical current thereby reducing inductance (Le) within the motor circuit.Circuit inductance can have the negative effect of reducing the speaker's SPL, when input power is high (so-called power compression). Lower motor circuit inductance = less power compression.

Products such as the CF1025C mid/bass loudspeaker and the CF1840JD woofer feature demodulation rings.
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